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Speakers

Aaron Quint

Aaron Quint

Paperless Post

http://www.quirkey.com

Aaron Quint is a born and raised Brooklynite now living in the Bay Area. He is the CTO of Paperless Post, a Rubyist, a JS-er, an avid open-sourcer and an amateur charcutier. Twitter: http://twitter.com/aq Github: http://github.com/quirkey

Topic: Metrics Driven Development

I’ve been reformed. Before I was blind, now I can see. How was I living in a world where I was making changes to our app and product without visibility into how that change actually affected our success? At Paperless Post we’re using a number of different tools and strategies for making small incremental changes to our application and measuring their success. We’ve also been working on a number of custom tools for different teams within our organization to help the company as a whole. I’ll talk about tools like Redis, Rollout, Graphite/Statsd and a number of real world scenarios and use cases.

Alan Gardner

Alan Gardner

EdgeCase UK

http://www.planeturf.net

Alan Gardner is an artisan at EdgeCase with a deep love, some would say unnaturally so, for the Ruby language. He has developed software in Ruby, Java and Delphi for international oil companies, social networking sites and even New York fashion houses (despite appearing to get dressed in the middle of a hedge).

Hailing from the frozen north, Alan is used to extended periods without sunlight, making him well suited to life as a codemonger. He has worn a mullet for longer than was decent, almost flown a helicopter into a pylon and was once bitten in the eye by a sandfly. It was as painful as it sounds.

Topic: Perfectionists Anonymous

Presented together with Erin O’Brien.

Do you ever find that your need for things to be perfect is holding you back from completing tasks, even simple ones? Do you have a backlog of projects that you mean to start, but never get round to because you want to get them ‘just right’? Have you ever given up learning something due to the frustration that you weren’t grokking it fast enough? Ever procrastinated for hours or even days over a niggly detail because the current solution just didn’t feel right? If so, then you might just be suffering from the adverse effects of perfectionism. Don’t worry though, you are not alone!

We are Erin O’Brien and Alan Gardner, and we are perfectionists.

We will use the latest research on perfectionistic cognitions and behaviors to discuss the pros and cons of being a perfectionist, specifically as it relates to software development. We’ll look at small changes you can make to avoid the pitfalls, and discuss how you can turn perfectionism to your advantage.

Ben Orenstein

Ben Orenstein

thoughtbot

http://www.codeulate.com

Ben has spoken in several countries and in multiple languages, in venues varying from tiny closets to slightly larger closets.

He is the creator of Vim University, author of Speaking for Hackers, and co-creator of HackerEngine.

When not demanding that everyone remap caps lock to escape, Ben writes code at thoughtbot, occasionally correctly.

Topic: What Rubyists should steal from Haskell and Clojure

Ruby is a great little language, but that doesn’t mean it got everything right. This talk will be a tour of the best features from Clojure and Haskell that you can’t find in Ruby. The goal isn’t to try to convert you to these languages, but to expand your knowledge of the best ideas in programming language design. We’ll also see how understanding the rationale behind these features can help you write better Ruby.

If concepts like anaphora, destructuring binds, and monads aren’t familiar to you, prepare to learn some powerful concepts. And don’t worry: this won’t be some voice-from-the-clouds, ivory tower tutorial. Just a pragmatic guy teaching cool ideas with simple examples. No neckbeard required.

Brian Doll runs marketing at GitHub. A business and technology hacker who’s been building things online for 15 years, Brian’s engineering career led naturally to… marketing? It’s true. After several engineering and management roles, Brian worked with New Relic on technical marketing and evangelism and is now resident marketer at GitHub.

Topic: Marketing for Geeks

Ugh, marketing? Always over-promising, annoying and full of spam? No. Marketing is essential to a successful product, so let’s make it awesome. Incorporating a marketing mindset during development helps us stay focused on making a real impact on real customers.

This talk will explore key marketing patterns that are applicable to any product or service. We’ll see how marketing works at GitHub and New Relic and discuss lessons learned from both companies. Taking marketing beyond work, we’ll also discuss how marketing can help our open source projects.

Corey Haines

Corey Haines

coreyhaines

http://www.coreyhaines.com

Corey Haines likes to code. He also likes to talk. Yay! Now he gets to combine those interests.

Topic: Mocks RULE!

Mocks and Stubs and Spies, Oh My! These handy little tools are common scape goats in talks, yet they can be incredibly handy when using test-driven development as a focused design partner for your system. In this talk, I will go over some of the truly AWESOME things that test doubles bring to your design and development. We’ll look at common situations where using test doubles can be problematic and how those problems are actually red flags that your design has problems.

Erin O’Brien has a Master of Science Degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and is working towards her PhD at Wright State University. Her research interests include item response theory and differential item functioning. She has spoken on the topic of women in technology at Scottish Ruby Conference and was a keynote speaker at Great Lakes Ruby Bash.

Erin is a professional amazing aunt, plans to be a student for the rest of her life, and is a self-proclaimed Ruby Groupie (though she doesn’t speak the language).

Topic: Perfectionists Anonymous

Presented together with Alan Gardner.

Do you ever find that your need for things to be perfect is holding you back from completing tasks, even simple ones? Do you have a backlog of projects that you mean to start, but never get round to because you want to get them ‘just right’? Have you ever given up learning something due to the frustration that you weren’t grokking it fast enough? Ever procrastinated for hours or even days over a niggly detail because the current solution just didn’t feel right? If so, then you might just be suffering from the adverse effects of perfectionism. Don’t worry though, you are not alone!

We are Erin O’Brien and Alan Gardner, and we are perfectionists.

We will use the latest research on perfectionistic cognitions and behaviors to discuss the pros and cons of being a perfectionist, specifically as it relates to software development. We’ll look at small changes you can make to avoid the pitfalls, and discuss how you can turn perfectionism to your advantage.

Joseph Wilk

Joseph Wilk

Songkick.com

http://www.josephwilk.net

Joseph Wilk is a coder, a tester and a teacher. He suffers from test obsession and has given up hope of any treatment that does not involve high voltages. He works as a senior developer at a startup Songkick helping shape the future of live music.

Topic: Someone is wrong

Inspiration strikes you, you’ve done it. You have found the missing 7 letters from the MVC model. This changes everything. You start discussing it with your pair. 10 minutes later you somehow find yourself arguing if mocks are good or bad. Jettisoning your pair you gather all you’re fellow colleagues for a quick discussion. Bracing yourself you unleash the full power of your words. 10 minutes later and somehow your idea has been lost and the discussion has devolved into discussing if mocks are good or bad. You’re not quite sure what happend but you walk away realising you failed to convince your team or pair of this amazing concept. Maybe it was a bad idea, maybe it was the idea that would make everyones life better. Being able to convince and discuss your idea is the skill of Rhetoric. A tool no developer can live without.

Katrina Owen

Katrina Owen

Bengler

http://bengler.no/

Katrina ran away from the circus and found her true home in the land of computers and code. She enjoys optimizing and automating, taking busywork away from smart people and putting it into code where it belongs. She is the problem solver you want on your side. She is driven by an inexplicable urge to refactor, and has for the past 6 years volunteered as a nitpicker at the javaranch.com Cattle Drive, where she attempts to brainwash others to appreciate and write clean code. She appreciates a good steak, and admits to enjoying a nice stick fight.

Topic: Therapeutic Refactoring

Enter deadline center stage, exit best practices, quietly, rear stage left.

The results are rarely pretty.

Refactoring can pry panic’s fingers away from your poor, overburdened adrenal glands and restore your sanity. Not that it went missing, of course. Never that!

This talk will cover the two reasons why refactoring works as well as (or better than) whiskey, sky diving, and massages as therapy, explore a handful of effective strategies to ensure that the rubber meets the road, and contains gory before shots and slick after shots of ruby code that has served therapeutic purpose.

Konstantin Haase

Konstantin Haase

Travis CI

http://rkh.im

As current maintainer of Sinatra, Konstantin is an Open Source developer by heart. Ruby has become his language of choice since 2005. He regularly contributes to different widespread projects, like Rubinius, Rack, Travis, Rails and MRI.

He currently holds the position of “Berry Sparkling Lord” at Travis CI.

Topic: We don't know HTTP

Everyone knows HTTP! Well, that’s not entirely true. There are large parts unknown to most web developers, well, even browser vendors, as it seems, and the wheel is invented over and over again to fix issues we wouldn’t even have, if people would make use of their toolbox. There are two options to fix this: You can reading RFC 2616 over and over again or you can listen to this highly opinionated talk exploring facets of HTTP that most developers are probably not too well aware of and how to make best use of it.

Kyle Neath

Kyle Neath

GitHub

http://warpspire.com

Kyle Neath is something like a designer who has an irrational fear of checkboxes. He spends his nights (and sometimes days) designing and building tools for other designers and developers at GitHub, where it’s rumored they’re trying to build the best company in the world. Kyle has an addiction to building great things, shipping, and fine IPAs.

Topic: Building an army of robots

There’s nothing quite like writing code to automate a task. It’s like bottled satisfaction for coders. With that in mind, I want to introduce you to GitHub’s army of robots. Robots to test our code and deploy. Robots to open doors. Robots to play our music. Robots to record videos of presenters. Robots to serve us beer.

Robots improve quality of life. Robots remove the separation between programmers and designers. They replace managers and large QA departments. They ensure GitHub continues to be a company full of hackers.

Randall Thomas

Randall Thomas

Thunderbolt Labs

http://thunderboltlabs.com

Randall Thomas (@daksis) is a classically trained musician that took one too many calculus classes and got sucked into the geekery of computers. Afflicted with rabid technology ADD, Randall has worked in various industries with numerous startups covering everything from robotics, to digital video to cloud computing.

Randall’s most recent obsession with shiny new technology comes in the form of data analytics, applied statistics and functional computing languages.

Topic: Ruby in Motion

Ruby and Open Kinect makes for a powerful and fun combo. I’ve been hacking on a project controlling digital music with machine learning and motion interfaces. I think you might like it.

Ryan Briones

Ryan Briones

Groupon

http://ryanbriones.com

Ryan is a practicing software craftsman currently living and working in Chicago, IL. In nearly a decade Ryan has designed systems for ISPs, non-profit corporations and web startups. For the last 5 years Ryan has had the pleasure of using Ruby almost exclusively and gives back to the Ruby ecosystem whenever possible. Ryan is a Señor Engineer at Groupon, is a life-long learner and is on his way to becoming a full-blown coffee snob.

Topic: The Beauty of Simplicity: Mastering Database Design Using Redis

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the last couple of years, you probably know how fantastic Redis is. It combines the simplicity of a key-value store with the power of data structures to give you a Swiss Army-like API for doing amazing things with your data.

But what if we took our love for Redis a step further?

In this presentation we will talk through the lessons I learned when attempting to use Redis as my only datastore for an application. We will also look at how these lessons can be applied to your decision making in all of your data-driven applications, regardless of the datastore.

Steve Klabnik

Steve Klabnik

Jumpstart Lab

http://jumpstartlab.com

Steve is an amazing Jeff Casimir impersonator.

Topic: Adventures on the Golden Path

Rails 1.0 was about proving we could build the same functionality as the other web frameworks, but doing it faster. Rails 2.0 was about pushing the vanguard forward, setting new trends for how the web should be built. Rails 3.0 paid down technical debt and laid the foundation for our future.

Now what?

Rails has always guiding developers down the “golden path” of best practices. Let’s look at potholes needing filling, ways we can straighten the dangerous corners, and figure out where this road might be heading.

Organiser

  • Elabs

Gold sponsors

  • Hashrocket
  • Engine Yard

Silver sponsors

  • Valtech
  • GitHub
  • ProjectPuzzle

Interested in sponsoring Nordic Ruby?

Supporters